PO Box 101 ~ 300 Memorial Drive, South Bend, WA 98586
(360) 875-9340 Office ~ (360) 875-9341 EOC ~ (360) 875-9342 Fax

Wednesday, November 23, 2011

High Wind Warning Issued for Thursday

South Bend, Washington – The National Weather Service (NWS) in Portland has issued a high wind warning which is in effect from 10:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. Thursday for the South Washington Coast.  

Strong south winds will develop Thursday morning and continue through Thursday afternoon. South winds will rise to 30 to 40 mph with gusts to around 60 mph near beaches. Tree branches may break off and locally obstruct roadways and power outages may occur.   

Precautionary/Preparedness Actions: 

A high wind warning means a hazardous high wind event is expected or occurring. Sustained wind speeds of at least 40 mph or gusts of 58 mph or more can lead to property damage. 

For the most up to date weather information from the NWS please visit http://www.weather.gov/portland. This page brings up all advisories, watches, and warnings for the Southwest Washington area.

Tuesday, November 22, 2011

NWS Issues Flood Warning

South Bend, Washington – The National Weather Service (NWS) in Portland has issued a flood warning for the following rivers in Pacific County:

·        Willapa River: flood warning is in effect from this evening to Wednesday afternoon. The river is forecast to rise above flood stage around 9:00 p.m. Tuesday and is expected to crest near 22.5 feet around 4:00 a.m. Wednesday. Expect widespread flooding. Historically, numerous roads are flooded with deep and swiftly moving water including Heckard Road and Highway 101. The magnitude of flooding on Highway 101 may be exacerbated by the high tide late Wednesday morning. 
·        Naselle River: flood warning is in effect from this evening to Wednesday morning. The river is forecast to crest just above flood stage around 10:00 p.m. Tuesday. Expect flooding in numerous lowland areas along the Naselle. Historically, water begins to surround homes along and near the river at this point. A few roads are flooded at this level including State Route 4.  

Three to five inches of rain have fallen over the Willapa Hills in Southwest Washington since Monday afternoon. An additional two to three inches of rain are expected Tuesday pushing rivers above flood stage.  

Please visit the NWS website at http://www.weather.gov/portland for the latest river stages and forecasts.  

Precautionary/Preparedness Actions:

Don’t drive into flooded areas. Avoid walking near riverbanks during high water.

Monday, November 21, 2011

High Wind Warning and Flood Watch Issued

South Bend, Washington – The National Weather Service (NWS) in Portland has issued a high wind warning which is in effect from 10:00 p.m. this evening to 10:00 p.m. Tuesday for the South Washington and North and Central Oregon Coasts.

South winds 30 to 40 mph with gusts to 60 mph are expected beginning late this evening and continuing through most of Tuesday. South winds 40 to 50 mph with gusts to 75 or 80 mph are expected near beaches and headlands. Winds are expected to begin decreasing late Tuesday afternoon on the South Washington Coast and during Tuesday evening for the North and Central Oregon Coasts.

A flood watch is in effect from Tuesday morning through Wednesday afternoon for portions of Southwest Washington and Northwest Oregon. Three to six inches of rain is expected in the Willapa Hills and North Oregon Coast range potentially driving creeks and small rivers to flood Tuesday and possibly Wednesday. Significant rises are expected on larger coastal rivers but they are starting off low. 

Precautionary/Preparedness Actions:

A high wind warning means a hazardous high wind event is expected or occurring. Sustained wind speeds of at least 40 mph or gusts of 58 mph or more can lead to property damage.

A flood watch means there is a potential for flooding based on current forecasts. Landslides and debris flows are possible during this flood event. People, structures and roads located below steep slopes, in canyons and near the mouths of canyons may be at serious risk from rapidly moving landslides.

Weather spotters are encouraged to report significant weather conditions according to standard operating procedures. 

For the most up to date weather information from the NWS please visit http://www.weather.gov/portland. This page brings up all advisories, watches, and warnings for the southwest Washington area.

Wednesday, November 16, 2011

High Wind Warning Issued

South Bend, Washington – The National Weather Service (NWS) in Portland has issued a high wind warning which is in effect from 10:00 a.m. this morning to 6:00 p.m. this evening near the beaches and headlands of South Washington and North Oregon coasts.  This replaces the high wind watch which was previously in effect. 

South winds increasing to 25 to 35 mph with gusts to 60 mph are expected for the headlands and open beaches.  Gusts to 45 are predicted for the coastal communities.  Strongest winds are expected in the afternoon.  Rain from 1” to 1.5” is expected with this weather system.

Precautionary/Preparedness Actions:

A high wind warning means a hazardous high wind event is expected or occurring.  Sustained wind speeds of at least 40 mph or gusts of 58 mph or more can lead to property damage.  

For the most up to date weather information from the NWS please visit http://www.weather.gov/portland.  This page brings up all advisories, watches, and warnings for the southwest Washington area.

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Tuesday, November 1, 2011

Skywarn Spotter Training Offered November 8th in Ocean Park

The National Weather Service Portland Office will offer Skywarn Spotter Program training on Tuesday, November 8, 2011, from 7:00 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. at the Pacific County Fire District 1 Ocean Park Fire Station Community Room, 26109 Ridge Ave, Ocean Park, WA 98640

The National Weather Service welcomes volunteers with an interest in severe weather spotting.  The Skywarn program is totally voluntary.  You will be trained on weather events similar to those listed in the Severe Weather Spotters Guide, and you may have the opportunity to call in several times a month depending on the weather pattern in your neck-of-the-woods. 

If you agree, the National Weather Service may occasionally call you for a ground truth as to what is actually happening near your home.  Most likely the phone call will be to confirm an element of potentially severe thunderstorms, like large hail, or damaging wind.  Other calls may be to verify heavy snowfall or peak wind speed associated with large winter storms. 

Additional information may be found at:  http://www.wrh.noaa.gov/pqr/skytraining.php